Cal Poly Dedicates New Digital Typeface ‘Prince Bold’ in Honor of Raymond J. Prince

Cal Poly’s Graphic Communication Department introduced a new font, Prince Bold, to honor Ray Prince, a longtime benefactor and friend of the department.


Prince Bold is a digital reconstruction of a wood type-font originally named Roman XX Condensed, first offered in 1838 by the George Nesbitt Co. of New York. Cal Poly Professor Brian Lawler recreated the typeface and presented it during the department’s 2016 International Graphic Communication Week banquet held last month. The font is now issued by the Shakespeare Press Museum at Cal Poly.

“Ray Prince has become an icon at Cal Poly for the support he has provided to the Graphic Communication Department through wisdom and resources,” said Ken Macro, chair of the department. “He is a philosopher of printing, and it is befitting that his name will live on in perpetuity through a revival display typeface.”

Prince is a well-known printing industry expert. He has served in executive positions for industry companies and associations, has published worldwide, and continues to be a highly sought-after consultant. He is a lifelong advocate for the printing industry and for graphic communication education.

Prince is responsible for the Raymond J. Prince Graphic Arts Collection at Cal Poly—the largest library collection of its kind. He donated $2.3 million to Cal Poly’s Graphic Communication Department last fall to preserve the history and knowledge of the printing and imaging industry.

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